What is the purpose of inflating a balloon with vinegar and baking soda?

Why do balloons inflate with vinegar and baking soda?

When vinegar and baking soda mix, they create the gas carbon dioxide and water. The carbon dioxide has no where to go, but into the balloon – blowing it up. … This is because the colder temperature causes the reaction to take place more slowly, releasing the gas less effectively.

Will the balloon size grow bigger if more vinegar is in the bottle?

Both changes occur because new substances are created during the chemical reaction. The size of the balloon gives an estimate of the amount of gas produced in the reaction. If you want a bigger balloon you should use more baking soda and vinegar because then more carbon dioxide gas will be produced.

What is the conclusion of mixing baking soda and vinegar?

The experiment and result of it supported our hypothesis that the bubbles would float on top of the mixture of the baking soda and vinegar. It did this because when we combined the baking soda and vinegar it had a chemical reaction that produces carbon dioxide gas.

What causes the balloon to inflate?

Air molecules collide into the balloon with the same energy inside and outside the balloon. When the bottle is heated, the air molecules inside start moving faster. These molecules now collide into the balloon with more energy resulting in increased pressure. The increased pressure causes the balloon to expand.

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Why does vinegar and baking soda react?

Mixing baking soda and vinegar will create a chemical reaction because one is an acid and the other a base. Baking soda is a basic compound called sodium bicarbonate while vinegar is a diluted solution that contains acetic acid (95% water, 5% acetic acid). … The first is called an acid-base reaction.

What chemicals react with vinegar?

The reaction is: Sodium bicarbonate and acetic acid reacts to carbon dioxide, water and sodium acetate. The solid baking soda was placed in liquid vinegar producing carbon dioxide gas, which is evident because of the formation of bubbles in the foaming mixture.